Sleep issues can come from a wide range of day to day stressors. Whether you’re dealing with nervous jitters, anxious feelings, restlessness, or even soreness after an intense workout — getting a full night’s rest doesn’t always come easy.

Luckily, cannabidiol (CBD) offers relief for those struggling with sleep issues, especially when paired with certain terpenes to promote sound slumber. The recent uptick in CBD products has taken the world by storm, helping countless people discover traditional methods for therapeutic benefits. CBD has a long and winding history, but we’re here to talk about a very specific aspect of cannabidiol.

One of the many ways CBD helps those struggling with a wide range of issues is through terpenes.

What are Terpenes?

Terpenes are everywhere. Even if you don’t realize it, you’ve likely experienced terpenes today. They’re responsible for the aromatic profile (or scent) of plants, many of which make their way into products you use every day.

CBD has hundreds of naturally occurring terpenes, each doing their part to provide distinct user experiences. When these terpenes interact with CBD ingredients, they form the entourage effect — a synergistic relationship that promotes benefits from both compounds.

Whether it’s uplifting your mood, reducing stress, or even getting a great night’s sleep — certain terpenes can affect your experiences with CBD. So, if you’re looking to get some well-deserved shut-eye in this crazy world, here are some terpenes to look for in your CBD products.

4 Best Terpenes for Sleep

All terpenes work differently, especially when paired with CBD. As mentioned, this interaction (commonly known as the entourage effect) boosts both terpenes and cannabidiol’s effectiveness for improved benefits.

Caryophyllene

You can find caryophyllene in a wide range of herbs and spices. Its aromatic profile is quite diverse, ranging anywhere from floral and earthy to citrusy. However, compared to other terpenes, it’s most definitely on the spicier side. You can commonly find caryophyllene in: 

  • • Black pepper 
  • • Oregano
  • • Basil 
  • • Cinnamon
  • • Hops
  • Cloves

Caryophyllene is unique, as it’s the only terpene (that we know of) that also acts as a cannabinoid. You may also see caryophyllene referred to as beta-caryophyllene (BCP). If you’re well-versed in essential oils, you’ve probably seen it in rosemary or even clove oil. 

The unique structure of caryophyllene helps it bind to CB2 receptors, giving it the ability to activate endocannabinoid receptors and help offer a wide range of health benefits and therapeutic potential. 

Its unique profile, stress-relieving properties, and soothing qualities make it a great terpene for those struggling with sleep.

Linalool

You can find linalool in a wide range of cannabis strains, offering therapeutic benefits to help promote sound sleep. Linalool has a spicy lavender-like aromatic profile and is commonly found in well over 200 plants. You may have experienced linalool in:

  • Lavender
  • Birchbark
  • Rosewood
  • Sweet basil
  • Laurel

Compared to myrcene, linalool is actually fairly rare in most commercial cannabis strains — at least at high levels. However, that doesn’t mean it doesn’t have a long history of traditional medicinal use. It has been used for sedative properties and reducing feelings of nervousness throughout history.

There’s a reason why so many yogis and massage therapists take advantage of lavender oil — as its calming effects are a great way to help promote relaxation and restfulness.

Myrcene

Myrcene is one of the most common terpenes — especially when it comes to cannabis strains. You’ll also find myrcene in hops or lemongrass and has a fairly peppery and spicy aromatic profile. It’s been used for centuries in traditional medicines for its sedative effects. Out in the wild, you may find myrcene in:

  • Thyme
  • Mangos
  • Lemongrass

So, how common is myrcene? Extremely common when we look at popular cannabis strains — and make up a good portion of various terpene profiles in commercial cannabis. Leafly identified myrcene makes up roughly 20% of the terpene profile in the modern commercial strain market.

 

It’s known for its dominance, meaning it composes the highest level of terpene in flower. Cannabis is known for a diverse terpene profile — very few of their terpenes are classified as “dominant.” Myrcene is one of them.

So, how does myrcene help with sleep? Well, as we’ve mentioned, it’s been used throughout history to help put people to bed. Through its sedative and relaxing effects, it’s a great terpene to look for if you’re sitting up at night — unable to rest peacefully.

Terpinolene

Compared to other terpenes, terpinolene has a far more complex and diverse aromatic profile. It’s a bit floral and herbaceous — but it’s also slightly piney and even citrusy. Yes, we know, that’s confusing — but we warned you, it’s complex! You may find terpinolene in:

  • • Lilacs
  • • Cumin
  • • Nutmeg 
  • • Apples
  • • Tea Trees

It has a fresh scent, which is perhaps why it’s found in many common products like soaps and perfumes. However, it’s still an essential oil that offers some great sleep-promoting properties. With that being said, the complexities continue — as terpinolene is both renowned for its sedative properties and uplifting effects, so you may have to pay close attention to what other terpenes are in your product to get the desired results. 

Find the Right CBD Products for You

Discovering CBD products containing the right terpenes isn’t too difficult nowadays, as cannabidiol continues its momentum into more and more American’s health and wellness routines. Relaxing CBD oils to help soothe sore bodies and even promote healthy sleep are super-easy to take and offer a mixture of calming terpenes. You can even quench your nighttime thirst with CBD beverages packed with caryophyllene and linalool to help get the rest you need.